Reflection: Our Lady of the Rosary

2009-10-07-casa-rosary-reflection

Memorial, October 7

Mass
First Reading: Jon 4:1-11
Responsorial: Ps 86:3-4, 5-6, 9-10
Gospel: Lk 11:1-4

Reflection
I had a hard time choosing between the readings of the day and the memorial of Our Lady of the Rosary. On one hand, following the saga of Jonah always makes for an interesting read and, on the other, listening to Mary’s vocation unfold in scripture is one that is always special to us as Marianists.

At the start of Mass, I went with the readings of the day because that guarantees I get to talk about Jonah as well as Mary!

As outside observers listening to his story, we discover that Jonah has an interesting story. He is quite a character who is called by God and tries to do what God asks of him. However, along the way,  he seems to get distracted and lose focus.

Instead of going to Nineveh, he runs away. He survives an incredible, three day ordeal of being swallowed by a fish. He finally does what God asks in Nineveh and, because of his efforts, the people repent! Yet, Jonah is displeased, becomes angry and wishes for death!

Jonah is such a human character and, in many ways, I can see myself in his actions. In my zeal to do God’s work, the reality of our inevitable humanity and shortcoming makes me question God’s presence. I sometimes lose focus of God’s love around me amid the challenges of daily life.

So, how do we focus on God’s love in the presence of our world’s imperfections? Today’s readings and memorial offer us an answer: Prayer.

There are many methods of prayer: The Rosary, the Our Father (which is the Gospel of the day), music, spiritual reading, meditation, faith-sharing, chanting psalms, etc. Despite these many ways to pray, Blessed Chaminade reminds us that there are few people of prayer.

One way to become people of prayer is to take to heart the following quotes:

“forgive our sins as we forgive others.” As C.S. Lewis once said, “we all believe that forgiveness is a beautiful concept, until we have to practice it.”

“Lord, treat me tomorrow as I treat others today.” — Whoah, that really holds us accountable to our actions!

“I am the servant of the Lord. Let it be done to me according to your word.” From the Gospel of today’s memorial, we hear the example of Mary who, despite the fact that she did not know the entirety of her vocation and where that would lead, said, “Yes.”

Mary faced several challenges in her vocation and, like Jonah, may have wanted to run away. But because of her faith, she remained focused on God’s promise and serves as an example for us to follow.

As we continue our celebration of the memorial of Our Lady of the Rosary, let us call on Mary to intercede for us as we grow to become her other Christs—Sons of Mary for the salvation of souls.

I had a hard time choosing between the readings of the day and the memorial of Our Lady of the Rosary. On one hand, following the saga of Jonah always makes for an interesting read and, on the other, listening to Mary’s vocation unfold in scripture is one that is always special to us as Marianists.
At the start of Mass, I went with the readings of the day because that guarantees I get to talk about Jonah as well as Mary!
As outside observers listening to his story, we discover that Jonah has an interesting story. He is quite a character who is called by God and tries to do what God asks of him. However, along the way,  he seems to get distracted and lose focus.
Instead of going to Nineveh, he runs away. He survives an incredible, three day ordeal of being swallowed by a fish. He finally does what God asks in Nineveh and, because of his efforts, the people repent! Yet, Jonah is displeased, becomes angry and wishes for death!
Jonah is such a human character and, in many ways, I can see myself in his actions. In my zeal to do God’s work, the reality of our inevitable humanity and shortcoming makes me question God’s presence. I sometimes lose focus of God’s love around me amid the challenges of daily life.
So, how do we focus on God’s love in the presence of our world’s imperfections? Today’s readings and memorial offer us an answer: Prayer.
There are many methods of prayer: The Rosary, the Our Father (which is the Gospel of the day), music, spiritual reading, meditation, faith-sharing, chanting psalms, etc. Despite these many ways to pray, Blessed Chaminade reminds us that there are few people of prayer.
One way to become people of prayer is to take to heart the following quotes:
“forgive our sins as we forgive others.” As C.S. Lewis once said, “we all believe that forgiveness is a beautiful concept, until we have to practice it.”
“Lord, treat me tomorrow as I treat others today.” — Whoah, that really holds us accountable to our actions!
“I am the servant of the Lord. Let it be done to me according to your word.” From the Gospel of today’s memorial, we hear the example of Mary who, despite the fact that she did not know the entirety of her vocation and where that would lead, said, “Yes.”
Mary faced several challenges in her vocation and, like Jonah, may have wanted to run away. But because of her faith, she remained focused on God’s promise and serves as an example for us to follow.
As we continue our celebration of the memorial of Our Lady of the Rosary, let us call on Mary to intercede for us as we grow to become her other Christs—Sons of Mary for the salvation of souls.a
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